Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 6th World Congress on Cell & Stem Cell Research Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

Day 3 :

  • Novel Stem Cell Technologies

Session Introduction

Joseph Purita

Institute of Regenerative and Molecular Orthopedics, USA

Title: Cutting edge concepts in the use of stem cell and prp injections in an office setting
Speaker
Biography:

Purita is director of Institute of Regenerative and Molecular Orthopedics. The Institute specializes in the use of Stem Cells and Platelet Rich Plasma injections. Dr. Purita is a pioneer in the use of Stem Cells and Platelet Rich Plasma. He received a B.S. and MD degree from Georgetown Univ. Dr. Purita is board certified in Orthopedics by ABOS. He has fellowships in the American College of Surgeons, American Academy Orthopedic Surgeons, and American Academy of Pain Management. He has lectured and taught extensively throughout the world on the use of Stem Cells and Platelet Rich Plasma as a visiting professor. He has been instrumental in helping other countries in the world establish guidelines for the use of Stem Cells in their countries.

Abstract:

The presentation concerns cutting edge aspects of PRP and Stem Cell (both bone marrow and adipose) injections for musculoskeletal conditions in an office setting. Indications are given as to which type of cell and technique to use to accomplish repair. Stem cells, both bone marrow derived (BMAC) and adipose, are used for the more difficult problems. PRP injections are utilized for the less severe problems. Indications are given when to use Stem Cells verses PRP and when to use both. The newest concepts in stem cell science are presented. These concepts include the clinical use of MUSE cells, exosomes, and Very Small Embryonic Like Stem Cells. Basic science of both PRP and stem cells are discussed. This presentation defines what constitutes an effective PRP preparation. Myths concerning stem cells are dispelled. One myth is that mesenchymal stem cells are the most important stem cell. This was the initial interpretation of Dr. Arnold Caplan the father of mesenchymal stem cell science. Dr. Caplan now feels that MSCs have an immunomodulation capacity which may have a more profound and immediate effect on joint chemistry and biology. We now learn in the talk that the hematopoietic stem cells are the drivers of tissue regeneration. Also discussed are adjuncts used which enhance the results. These therapies include supplements, LED therapy, lasers, electrical stimulation, and cytokine therapy. The scientific rationale is presented for each of these entities as to how they have a direct on stem cells.

Speaker
Biography:

Haval Shirwan is Dr. Michael and Joan Hamilton Endowed Chair in Autoimmune Disease, Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, Director of Molecular Immunomodulation Program at the Institute for Cellular Therapeutics. He conducted his Graduate studies at the University of California in Santa Barbara, CA, and Postdoctoral studies at California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, CA. He joined the University of Louisville in 1998 after holding academic appointments at various academic institutions in the United States. His research focuses on the modulation of immune system for the treatment of immune-based diseases with particular focus on type 1 diabetes, transplantation, and development of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines against cancer and infectious diseases. He is an inventor on over a dozen of worldwide patents, founder and CEO/CSO of FasCure Therapeutics, LLC, widely published, organized and lectured at numerous national/international conferences, served on study sections for various federal and non-profit funding agencies, and is on the Editorial Board of a dozen of scientific journals. He is member of several national and international societies and recipient of various awards.

Abstract:

We have recently shown that pancreatic islets engineered to display on their surface a novel form of FasL induce robust allotolerance. Tolerance is initiated by direct targeting of alloreactive pathogenic T effector cells with upregulated expression of Fas receptor for physical elimination through activation-induced cell death. The apoptotic process initiates a cascade of immunoregulatory mechanisms that involve phagocytes, TGF-β, and CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg cells. Treg cells are not only critical to the induction but also maintenance of tolerance. This talk will focus on extensive discussion of these mechanisms and implication of this novel immunomodulatory approach for altering the balance between T effector and Treg cells with potential application to graft rejection and autoimmune diseases where a favorable balance for Treg cells has therapeutic potential.

Speaker
Biography:

Julie Murrell is a Senior R&D Manager for Stem Cell Biology and Collaborations at EMD Millipore. Dr. Murrell has led an early technology assessment group for the past 7 years and has been part of the Stem Cell group for 3 years. Through that time, she has led the efforts to establish robust assays and identify new targets as key quality attributes for large scale stem cell manufacturing, with a special focus on hMSCs. Dr. Murrell’s background is in Cell and Molecular Biology. Her multi-disciplinary background has led to innovative team-driven approaches in the field of stem cell production.

Abstract:

As innovators move closer to clinical success, a gap in the ability to cost effectively manufacture cell therapies has been identified. To address this gap, we have demonstrated the use of single-use expansion and harvest systems that robustly expand and recover a variety of stem cells. An additional contributor to the system is the inclusion of high quality reagents that are animal origin free, lead to better yields and are supplied with a strong regulatory dossier. We will present data regarding ease of use, yield, viability and characterization for full solution expansion and harvest of manufactured cell therapies. Start to finish solutions for expansion and harvest are key enabling technologies for success in commercializing cell therapies.

Speaker
Biography:

Professor Min Fang got her Ph.D from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, CAS in 2003. She got her postdoc training in Fox Chase Cancer Center in USA mainly on studying the pathogenesis of viral infection, as well as the mechanisms by which vaccines afford protection. She joined the Institute of Microbiology, CAS in June, 2012 as a professor supported by “Thousand Young Talents Program” of the China’s government. Her work was published in esteemed journals such as: Immunity, J Exp Med, PNAS, Plos Pathogen, etc, and multiply works were selected and referred by the “Faculty of 1000”.

Abstract:

Natural killer (NK) cells are bone marrow-derived lymphocytes crucial for host defense against several infections and cancer. We have previously shown that compared to young, aged C57BL/6 mice have decreased numbers of mature NK cells, resulting in susceptibility to mousepox, a lethal disease caused by ectromelia virus. We also found that the natural killer cell dysfunction of aged mice is due to the bone marrow stroma, not NK cell intrinsic. To investigate the melocular mechanisms that regulat the defective NK cell development in aged mice, we used high throughput sequencing to compare the gene expression differences between young and aged NK cells. We found that over 300 genes were differentially expressed in the aged NK cells compared to the youngs. Further identification of the main or check point regulators will shed new lights on the regulation of NK cell development in the aging enviroment.

Break: Networking & Refreshments 10:40-11:05 @ Foyer
Speaker
Biography:

Paul Davis is Professor of Medicine at Albany Medical College and former Chair of the Department of Medicine at that institution. He has co-authored 250 publications, most of which deal with thyroid hormone actions. Shaker Mousa is Executive Vice President and Chair, Pharmaceutical Research Institute of the Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences. He was a Principal Research Scientist at DuPont. He has co-authored 600 publications. Hung-Yun Lin is Professor in the Graduate Institute of Cancer Biology and Drug Discovery, College of Medical Science and Technology, Taipei Medical University. Drs. Mousa, Lin and Davis have collaborated in studies of nongenomic actions of thyroid hormone and tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac) and NDAT.

Abstract:

The PD-1 (programmed death-1)/PD-L1 (PD-ligand 1) checkpoint is a critical regulator of activated T cell-cancer cell interactions, serving to defend tumor cells against host immune destruction. Nano-diamino-tetrac (NDAT; Nanotetrac) is an anticancer/anti-angiogenic agent targeted to the thyroid hormone-tetrac receptor on the extracellular domain of integrin αvβ3. NDAT inhibits the cancer cell PI3-K and MAPK signal transduction pathways that are critical to PD-L1 gene expression. We examined actions in vitro of thyroid hormone (L-thyroxine, T4) and NDAT on PD-L1 mRNA abundance (qPCR) and PD-L1 protein content in human breast cancer (MDA-MB-231) cells and colon carcinoma (HCT116 and HT-29) cells. In MDA-MB-231 cells, a physiological concentration of T4 (10-7 M total; 10-10 M free hormone) stimulated PD-L1 gene expression by 38% and increased PD-L1 protein by 2.7-fold (p<0.05, all changes). NDAT (10-7 M) reduced PD-L1 in T4-exposed cells by 21% (mRNA) and 39% (protein) (p<0.05, all changes). In HCT116 cells, T4 enhanced PD-L1 gene expression by 17% and protein content by 24% (p<0.05). NDAT reduced basal PD-L1 mRNA by 35% and protein by 31% and in T4-treated cells lowered mRNA by 33% and protein by 66%. In HT-29 cells, T4 increased PD-L1 mRNA by 62% and protein by 27%. NDAT lowered basal and T4-stimulated responses in PD-L1 mRNA and protein by 35-40% (p<0.05). Activation of ERK1/2 was involved in T4-induced PD-L1 accumulation. We propose that, by a nongenomic mechanism, endogenous T4 may clinically support activity of the defensive PD-1/PD-L1 checkpoint in tumor cells. NDAT non-immunologically suppresses basal and T4-induced PD-L1 gene expression in cancer cells.

Speaker
Biography:

earned my PhD degree from the University of Bradford, UK as an awardee of Chancellor Cancer Research Studentship- A collaborative PhD scholarship offered by University of Bradford, UK and SKMCH&RC, Pakistan. I aim to establish my career in cancer research in Pakistan. Oral cancer incidence is high in this part of world because of various life style choices. My research study is first attempt in Pakistan to study this disease using mass spectrometry. The pilot study was initiated in April 2013 using facilities at Basic Sciences Research Laboratory, SKMCH&RC and Institute of Cancer Therapeutics, University of Bradford, UK. This is an ongoing project and has been published in peer reviewed international journals (Cancer Cell International, 2014) and presented as posters in international meetings (BSPR meeting UK, 2015).

Abstract:

Recently a sub-population of cells with stem cell characteristics, reported to be associated with initiation, growth, spread and recurrence, has been identified in several solid tumors including oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC). The aim of our pilot study was to isolate CD44+cancer stem cells from primary cultures of OTSCC and neck node Level I (node-I) biopsies, grow cell spheres and observe their characteristics in primary cultures. Parallel cultures of hyperplastic lesions of tongue (non-cancer) were set up as a control. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect CD44/CD24 expression and magnetic activated cell sorting to isolate CD44+ cell populations followed by primary cell culturing. Both OTSCC and node-I biopsies produced floating spheres in suspension, however those grown in hyperplastic and node-I primary cultures did not exhibit selfrenewal properties. Lymph node metastatic OTSCC, express higher CD44/CD24 levels, produce cancer cell spheres in larger number and rapidly (24 hours) compared to node negative OTSCC (1 week) and non-cancer specimens (3 weeks). In addition, metastatic OTSCC have the capacity for proliferation for up to three generations in primary culture. This in vitro system will be used to study cancer stem cell behavior, therapeutic drug screening and optimization of radiation dose for elimination of resistant cancer cells.

Seyed Amir Mousavi

Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Iran

Title: Isolation of stem cells from dental pulp of primary teeth
Speaker
Biography:

I am dr seyed amir mousavi a licensed dentist with Post graduate education in Endodontics. I have research since 2007, and have trained multiple undergraduate students in Isfahan dental faculty. My DDS thesis was Isolation of stem cell from human exfoliated primary teeth.in my thesis we show that we can isolate stem cells from dental pulp of primary teeth and then we can differentiate these cells to other special cells like adipocyte. My MS thesis was Effect of topical dexamethasone on histologic response of human dental pulp to one step MTA direct pulp capping and partial pulpotomy: A randomized clinical trial.I have 4 publications in journals and 7 oral and poster presentations in international congresses. I still have interest in stem cells research.

Abstract:

Introduction: Finding an accessible resource is an important goal for stem-cell research. The aim of this study is to isolate the stem cells from dental pulp of deciduous teeth. Method and material: Anterior deciduous teeth from children 6 to 9 years old which were exfoliating normally were used in this experiment. The exfoliated teeth were immediately placed in a normal saline sterile solution containing antibiotics and were kept in 4 C. The dental pulp was isolated in complete sterile condition and then divided into small pieces with a fine scalpel. Then it was put on 4 mg/ml collagenase type 1 for one hour at 37 c for preparation of single cell suspention. The samples have been cultured in MEMenvironment. To prove that these cells are stem cells we used flow cytometry. Results: 1- Rest of pulp of deciduous teeth contains a population of fibroblast like cells. 2-SHED (stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth) show positive response toward CD90 as an excellent mesenchymal marker and show negative response toward CD31 as an endothelial marker. 3- The rate of reproduction in these stem cells was high. 4- SHED has an ability to differentiate into adipocytes andosteocytes. Conclusion: The deciduous teeth can be used as an accessible and great resource of stem cells without having any moral problems in researches involving tissue engineering.

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