Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 10th World Congress and Expo on Cell & Stem Cell Research New York, USA.

Day 2 :

Stem Cell Research 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mariusz Ratajczak photo
Biography:

Mariusz Z Ratajczak is Professor of Medicine, the Henry M and Stella M Hoenig Endowed Chair in Cancer Biology and the Director of the Developmental Biology Research Program at the University of Louisville's James Graham Brown Cancer Center. Among his prestigious awards is the 2014 Karl Landsteiner Life Achievement Award from the German Society of Transfusion Medicine and Immunohematotherapy. He has published numerous books and more than 470 peer-reviewed publications and is a frequent speaker at conferences worldwide. His work was cited more than 17000 and his Hirsh Index is 67.

 

Abstract:

Adult tissues harbor a population of rare stem cells endowed with broad differentiation potential described as very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) which display several epiblast/germline markers. Moreover, VSELs do express: several sex hormone (SexHs) receptors, respond to SexHs stimulation and share several markers characteristic of migrating primordial germ cells. Since VSELs can be specified e.g., into long-term hematopoietic hematopoietic stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells, this observation sheds new light on the adult stem cell hierarchy. Nevertheless, in spite of the expression of pluripotent stem cell markers, changes in the epigenetic signature of imprinted genes (e.g., by erasure of imprinting at the Igf-2–H19 locus) keep VSELs quiescent. In several emergency situations (e.g., heart infarct, stroke, skin burns), VSELs can be activated and mobilized into peripheral blood and contribute to tissue organ/regeneration. VSELs number correlates with life span in mice and we noticed a positive effect of regular physical exercise and calorie restriction on delaying age-dependent depletion of VSELs from adult tissues. Recently, we developed an efficient ex vivo expansion strategy in chemically defined medium to activate DNMT3L in these cells that re-methylates erased imprinted loci, what allows them for effective ex vivo expansion for potential clinical purposes. 

Keynote Forum

Khalid Shah

Harvard Medical School, USA

Keynote: Receptor targeted engineered stem cells: Therapeutic application for cancer and beyond

Time : 10:00

Stem Cell Research 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Khalid Shah photo
Biography:

Khalid Shah is an Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School and the Director of the Center for Stem Cell Therapeutics and Imaging at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH). He is also the Vice Chair of Research for the Department of Neurosurgery at BWH and a Principal Faculty at Harvard Stem Cell Institute in Boston. Since his move to BWH, he has started a joint Center of Excellence in Biomedicine with KACST and is also directing the new Center. He and his team have pioneered major developments in the stem cell therapy field, successfully developing experimental models to understand basic cancer biology and therapeutic stem cells for cancer, particularly brain tumors. These studies have been published in many high impact journals like Nature Neuroscience, PNAS, Nature Reviews Cancer, JNCI, Stem Cells and Lancet Oncology. Recently, his work has caught the attention in the public domain and as such it has been highlighted in the media world-wide including features on BBC and CNN. He holds current positions on numerous councils, advisory and Editorial Boards in the fields of stem cell therapy and oncology. In an effort to translate the exciting therapies developed in his laboratory into clinics, he has recently founded biotech company, AMASA Technologies Inc. whose main objective is the clinical translation of therapeutic stem cells in cancer patients.

 

Abstract:

Stem cell-based therapies are emerging as a promising strategy to tackle different disease types. We have identified different cell surface receptors on both tumor cells and tumor cell associated endothelial cells and engineered stem cells express bi-specific therapeutic agents that target these receptor types. Using our recently established invasive, recurrent and resection models of primary brain tumors (GBM) and breast and melanoma metastatic tumors in the brain that mimic clinical settings, we show that engineered human mesenchymal stem cells and neural stem cells expressing novel bi-functional proteins or loaded with oncolytic viruses target both the primary and the invasive tumor deposits and have profound anti-tumor effects. These studies demonstrate the strength of utilizing engineered stem cell based receptor targeted therapeutics for developing cancer therapeutics and have implications for developing innovative therapies for different diseases.

Keynote Forum

Paul J Davis

Albany Medical College, USA

Keynote: will be updating soon

Time : 10:30

Stem Cell Research 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Paul J Davis photo
Biography:

  • Dr Paul J Davis is a graduate of Harvard Medical School and had his postgraduate medical training at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and the NIH. His academic positions have included Chair, Department of Medicine at Albany Medical College. He has served as President of American Thyroid Association, as a member of the Board of Directors of the American Board of Internal Medicine and he is Co-Head, Faculty of 1000 – Endocrinology. He serves on multiple Editorial Boards of His scientific interests include molecular mechanisms of actions of nonpeptide hormones, particularly, thyroid hormone. He and his colleagues described the cell surface receptor for thyroid hormone on integrin αvß3 that underlies the pro-angiogenic activity of the hormone and the proliferative action of the hormone on cancer cells. He has co-authored more than 200 original research articles and 30 textbook chapters and he has edited three medical textbooks.

Abstract:

Stem Cell Research 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Sima T. Tarzami photo
Biography:

Sima T Tarzami has received her BSc and MSc degrees from Hofstra University, New York, and her PhD from Albert Einstein School of Medicine, New York in 2002. She was a Faculty in Mount Sinai School of Medicine from 2007 to 2015. She is currently an Associated Professor of Medicine at Howard University. Her laboratory studies the role of chemokines on cardiac myocyte biology. She focuses on cardiac physiology in both in vitro and in vivo models of heart failure. She is an author of 20 peer-reviewed papers and over 15 published abstracts.

Abstract:

An adult heart has an intrinsically limited capability to regenerate damaged myocardium, regardless of the underlying etiology. Embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell (ESC/iPSC)- based therapies offer a unique strategy for developing cell replacement therapies for numerous, varied disorders including cardiac diseases. iPSCs hold great promise in the field of regenerative medicine because of their ability to grow indefinitely and give rise to all cells of the body. Recently, investigators shown that pluripotent stem cells produce tissue-specific lineages through the programmed acquisition of sequential gene expression patterns that function as a road map for organ formation, therefore, identifying a procardiogenic network that promotes iPSCs differentiation to favor a cardiac lineage is of great interest. Since adult human hearts have very little ability to regenerate postnatally, stem-cell-based cardiac regeneration has also been considered as a therapeutic approach to treat ischemic heart disease. Since these cells have been shown to migrate to sites of injury and inflammation in response to soluble mediators including the chemokine stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1 also known as CXCL12). Here, we studied the role of SDF-1 and its receptors; CXCR4 and CXCR7 in transformation of pluripotent stem cells into IPSC-derived cardiomyocytes. This study demonstrates that CXCR4 and CXCR7 induce differential effects during cardiac lineage differentiation and β-adrenergic response in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs). In engineered cardiac tissues, depletion of CXCR4 or CXCR7 had opposing effects on developed force and chronotropic response to β-agonists demonstrating distinct roles for the SDF-1/CXCR4 or CXCR7 network in hiPSC-derived ventricular cardiomyocyte specification, maturation and function.

Keynote Forum

Ron Hart

University of Rutgers, USA

Keynote: will be updating soon

Time : 11:30

Stem Cell Research 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Ron Hart photo
Biography:

Ron Hart has done his B.S. in University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT and Ph.D.in University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. He has done his postdoctoral training under William Folk, advisor from University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI and Joseph Nevins, advisor from Rockefeller University, New York, NY. He is the Director of Human Genetics Institute of New Jersey Stem Cell Program and Co-Chair in Rutgers University Institutional Biosafety Committee.

Abstract: